voice tips

Voice tips for the social season 5: align intent and delivery

From intention to action. " Newton's Cradle " by Sheila Sund licenced by  CY BY 2.0 .

From intention to action. "Newton's Cradle" by Sheila Sund licenced by CY BY 2.0.

We're almost at the end of our week of voice tips, with just one more to help you make it through to Christmas. We hope they help you communicate more effectively in and out of work, both now and in the new year.

Tip 5: Align your intention with your delivery

We are most persuasive, convincing and effective when we show that we mean what we say. So don’t just tell – be. Aligning what you say with how you say it can help you deliver a clearer and more compelling message.

In essence, that means matching your tone with your meaning. It will help you imbue your words with the weight they deserve. So don’t undercut difficult messages with a nervous grin; and give grimaces a wide berth when explaining brilliant plans.

It might take a bit of effort sometimes, but you'll reap the rewards in terms of trust and confidence – both from others and within yourself.

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Voice tips for the social season 4: speak from your stomach

" Lambchop and More " by Tim Johnson licenced by  CC BY 2.0

"Lambchop and More" by Tim Johnson licenced by CC BY 2.0

Each day this week we're offering you a tip to help you survive the festivities with your voice intact – at least while you're at work.

Tip 4: Channel your inner ventriloquist

Okay, not really. Though just think of the possibilities for those tricky meetings...

It's not far off, however. Venter comes from the Latin for 'belly', and loqui from the Latin for 'speak'. So, with that in mind, imagine that you are speaking from your stomach rather than your throat.

The idea of this tip is to help the sound 'drop down' in your body. Making that psychological shift can help you breathe more deeply, project more clearly and audibly and avoid straining your voice.

I suggest giving all these tips a practice run so you can get a feel for them before your next high stakes meeting. When practising this one, you might find that placing your hand on your stomach helps to focus your attention.

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Voice tips for the social season 3: vocal clarity

' Slow Motion Water Droplet ' by Public Domain Photography licenced under  CC BY-SA 2.0

'Slow Motion Water Droplet' by Public Domain Photography licenced under CC BY-SA 2.0

Every day this week we're sharing some of our top tips to help you use your voice effectively, whether at work, rest or (nativity) play.

Tip 3: Vocal clarity

Stick your tongue out. Yep, that's right: stick your tongue out. Not only will it probably make you laugh, but it also releases tension in the tongue root. This, in turn, can help you articulate your words with a clearer and more resonant voice.

This exercise is particularly useful if you find that your voice seems to get smaller or somehow restricted when you’re under pressure. It takes just 30 seconds, and can be a helpful boost both at the start of the day, and during the day if you feel your stress levels rising.

1. Open your mouth

2. Tip of tongue behind bottom teeth

3. Stretch the middle of your tongue up and out of your mouth for 5 seconds

4. Stick your tongue all the way out for 5 seconds

5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 twice, so you have run through the sequence three times in total

 

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Voice tips for the social season 2: breathing

" Breathe " by Shawn Rossi is licenced by  CC BY 2.0

"Breathe" by Shawn Rossi is licenced by CC BY 2.0

All this week we're sharing our top tips to keep your voice in fine fettle at work during the season of mad-rush-to-finish-project-before-Christmas-meets-festive-socialising. As we sometimes think of it. Today, we have our second tip – one that seems so obvious it's almost always the first thing to slip.

Tip 2: Breathe

You know, generally. It's good for staying calm. And alive.

More specifically in this context, breathe in just before you speak, and speak as you exhale. I said it sounded obvious. But turn detective for a minute, and you'll notice that people often start speaking on almost no breathe – and quickly run out.

Speaking as you exhale enables you to project your voice much more easily – which, in turn, will help to prevent you straining your voice (a seasonal hazard). And you'll have enough breath to make your point effectively, instead of ditching the end in an inaudible mumble.

Slow controlled breathing also reduces your blood pressure. And that will help you engage with challenge more calmly and effectively, whether at work or the office knees up!

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Voice tips for the social season 1: pause per clause

Cocktail Glasses - Leeroy - Montreal Web Agency CC0 1.0 Universal.jpg

‘Tis the season to be jolly. And hoarse. So we’re sharing some of our top tips all this week to help you use your voice effectively whether at work or play. Well, mostly at work, but they should stand you in good stead for the office Christmas party, too.

Tip 1: Pause per clause

If you have something worth saying, give it the space to be heard and absorbed. Rushing reduces your impact. You'll not only be harder to understand, but come across as being not entirely present. Neither of which is very helpful when you're trying to make a point.

Most people speak faster when they're in uncertain, challenging or stressful situations. To counter that, try implementing a pause per clause. It'll both slow you down and give you time to breathe (always a bonus).

You should find that slowing down helps your words to land, and helps you develop greater presence. You'll probably feel calmer and more self-assured, too.

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Spring clean your presenting style

Spring cleaning

It looks like Spring is finally here so, in honour of the season, we're sharing five tips to rejuvenate presentations. A Spring clean, if you will. We hope they help you present with natural charisma and ensure your every word lands.

1. Breathe out

Ignore the advice ringing in your ears to take a deep breath. For most of us that results in either hyperventilation or heavy breathing – neither a good look when you need to impress. Breathing out first should help make your next inhalation deeper and more regular. It will calm you down if you’re nervous, and help you project more effectively either way.

Try it: as you're preparing, just before you start, and as you're changing slides.

 

2. Catch flies

Okay, not literally – but do breathe in and out through an open mouth. (Once referred to by a client as 'catching flies', in case you wondered.) It can be counter-intuitive, but it will make a significant difference. You'll breathe more deeply and with less effort, so you're free to focus on content. It should help to keep your facial and neck muscles relaxed too.

Try it: as you're preparing, just before you start, and a few times during the presentation.

 

3. Pause

Is it easy? No. Does it help? Yes. Will a split-second will feel like an eternity? Well, probably. It won’t be, though, and that brief pause will help you be present in the moment, marshal your thoughts, and ensure your audience is still engaged. It’ll also help them to take in what you’re saying so your messages land.

Try it: just before you start, and then at appropriate moments during the presentation.

 

4. Huh?

The second half of a sentence generally makes the whole meaningful. Not wise, then, to throw it away – whether through nerves or enthusiasm. Yet word swallowing is one of the most common issues we help with. Full, as opposed to shallow, breathing will help; as will simple awareness. It’s amazing how much more effective we are when we speak deliberately.

Try it: five minutes before you start, and then a few times during the presentation.

 

5. Aim for alignment

We are most persuasive, convincing and effective when we show that we mean what we say. So don’t just tell – be. Aligning your delivery with your meaning will imbue your words with the weight they deserve. So don’t undercut difficult messages with a nervous grin; and give grimaces a wide berth when explaining brilliant plans. Sounds obvious – yet it’s so often forgotten in the heat of the presenting moment!

Try it: before, during and after!

 

Want to learn more? Download our free Chirp Guide to find out how to use your voice more effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Five tips to help your voice work at work

Five tips to make your voice work at work

I was with a client recently who apologised for sounding so hoarse. She explained she’d been in end-to-end meetings the previous day. It was all very productive, she added, until she lost her voice.

The voice is critical to who we are; it forms so much of our identity. And, unless you’re a Trappist Monk, its effective use is key to successful work.

The impact of both words and actions can be transformed with a little attention to how we use our voices. So here are our five top tips to help you use yours to excellent effect.

 

1. Breathe before you speak. It sounds obvious but, particularly in nerve-wracking situations, most of us launch right in – and swiftly run out of breath. If most of your sentence is lost, you can guarantee its impact will be too. So: pause, then, breathe, and then speak!

 

2. Have a go at speaking as if from the stomach rather than the throat. It’ll help you project your voice – and lend authority – without raising it or straining. And that can be a boon in meetings.

(You’ll still need to open your mouth, of course. We’re not advising ventriloquism – however useful you might find that in meetings.)

 

3. Don’t rush! If you have something worth saying, give it the space to be heard and absorbed. In practice that means pausing and taking sufficient breath in longer sentences.

 

4. Think about how you want your words to be received. Delivery is almost as important as content – get those elements in harmony and your words will be infinitely more effective. If you need to persuade, for example, inject your words with energy – don’t undercut yourself by sounding unconvinced. It might take practice, but it’ll help imbue your words with meaning. And you’ll deliver clearer messages with greater impact as a result.

 

5. Be audible. If you’re feeling tired or nervous it can be hugely tempting to swallow your words. And that leaves colleagues baffled at best, and disengaged or irritated at worst. So make sure what you say can actually be heard. It will smooth communications and working relationships!

 

Want to learn more? Download our free Chirp Guide to find out how to use your voice more effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.