clarity

Voice tips for the social season 5: align intent and delivery

From intention to action. " Newton's Cradle " by Sheila Sund licenced by  CY BY 2.0 .

From intention to action. "Newton's Cradle" by Sheila Sund licenced by CY BY 2.0.

We're almost at the end of our week of voice tips, with just one more to help you make it through to Christmas. We hope they help you communicate more effectively in and out of work, both now and in the new year.

Tip 5: Align your intention with your delivery

We are most persuasive, convincing and effective when we show that we mean what we say. So don’t just tell – be. Aligning what you say with how you say it can help you deliver a clearer and more compelling message.

In essence, that means matching your tone with your meaning. It will help you imbue your words with the weight they deserve. So don’t undercut difficult messages with a nervous grin; and give grimaces a wide berth when explaining brilliant plans.

It might take a bit of effort sometimes, but you'll reap the rewards in terms of trust and confidence – both from others and within yourself.

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Why it pays to be precise

"Be precise." That was my dad's favourite phrase when I was growing up. Though infuriating at the time, it's proved to be sound advice. No one ever died from too much clarity, but lots of us have suffered the lack of it. Whether you're leading a team, collaborating with colleagues or negotiating social relationships, clarity makes everything so much easier.

What Sir Tom Jones knows about leadership

What Sir Tom knows about leadership

I have a confession: I’ve finally succumbed to BBC1’s The Voice. I blame the chairs. They’re huge, they light up, and they swivel on demand.

Though clearly thrilled to be picked via a revolving chair, the real draw for the contestants is superstar coaching. The chance for expert leadership from people who’ve been there, done it. And kept doing it.

Fervent aspiration with world-class authority is a compelling mix. The judges clearly know their stuff. But the big question is whether they can empower their teams to achieve the same. Essentially: will they be inspirational leaders?

Each coach has a different style, but it’s Sir Tom Jones that I’ve been watching closely. He knows his experience is an effective selling point. And barely a moment passes without another “starry collaboration” anecdote. (While we all wonder if there’s anyone he hasn’t sung with…)

Last week Sir Tom demonstrated what he's learned about leadership during all those years at the top. That it’s not enough to tell; you must also show. You must lead by example. By doing just that, he transformed his team’s uncertain, lacklustre delivery into a passionate, meaningful performance. Something had suddenly ‘clicked’, within just a few minutes.

One of my criticisms of the show until now has been that we've rarely seen the coaches up on stage. There’s something incredibly powerful about demonstrating excellence in the moment, rather than relying on previous success. Executed consistently, it creates clarity of purpose, avoids misunderstandings, and inspires observers.

Sir Tom seems to know that. Perhaps it's something he learned from all those musicians who inspired him. Either way, leading by example – modelling attitudes, behaviours and practice – is a powerful tool. And that’s the case whether you’re in front of six people or 6.95 million.

 

Want to learn more about how to be a leader who enables as well as inspires? Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide.