vocal strain

Voice tips for the social season 4: speak from your stomach

" Lambchop and More " by Tim Johnson licenced by  CC BY 2.0

"Lambchop and More" by Tim Johnson licenced by CC BY 2.0

Each day this week we're offering you a tip to help you survive the festivities with your voice intact – at least while you're at work.

Tip 4: Channel your inner ventriloquist

Okay, not really. Though just think of the possibilities for those tricky meetings...

It's not far off, however. Venter comes from the Latin for 'belly', and loqui from the Latin for 'speak'. So, with that in mind, imagine that you are speaking from your stomach rather than your throat.

The idea of this tip is to help the sound 'drop down' in your body. Making that psychological shift can help you breathe more deeply, project more clearly and audibly and avoid straining your voice.

I suggest giving all these tips a practice run so you can get a feel for them before your next high stakes meeting. When practising this one, you might find that placing your hand on your stomach helps to focus your attention.

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.

 

 

Voice tips for the social season 2: breathing

" Breathe " by Shawn Rossi is licenced by  CC BY 2.0

"Breathe" by Shawn Rossi is licenced by CC BY 2.0

All this week we're sharing our top tips to keep your voice in fine fettle at work during the season of mad-rush-to-finish-project-before-Christmas-meets-festive-socialising. As we sometimes think of it. Today, we have our second tip – one that seems so obvious it's almost always the first thing to slip.

Tip 2: Breathe

You know, generally. It's good for staying calm. And alive.

More specifically in this context, breathe in just before you speak, and speak as you exhale. I said it sounded obvious. But turn detective for a minute, and you'll notice that people often start speaking on almost no breathe – and quickly run out.

Speaking as you exhale enables you to project your voice much more easily – which, in turn, will help to prevent you straining your voice (a seasonal hazard). And you'll have enough breath to make your point effectively, instead of ditching the end in an inaudible mumble.

Slow controlled breathing also reduces your blood pressure. And that will help you engage with challenge more calmly and effectively, whether at work or the office knees up!

 

Sign up to download our free Chirp Guide on how to use your voice effectively in meetings, pitches and presentations.